Class Media

Course Readings and Other Media

(* = grad student paper presentation –rest of class submits paper commentary)

A Healthcare Revolution

Required reading

1. J. Rauch. A Healthcare Revolution. National Affairs, No. 24, Summer 2015, 66-85.

Self-Tracking I

Required reading

2. M. Bowden. The Measured Man. The Atlantic, July-Aug 2012.
3. M. Might. Harnessing the Net. Stanford Big Data in Biomedicine, June 2015 (video)
For fun: http://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/the-kings-new-years-fitness-journal

Kumar, S., Nilsen, W., Pavel, M., & Srivastava, M. (2013). Mobile health: Revolutionizing healthcare through transdisciplinary research. Computer, (1), 28-35.

Estrin, D. (2014). Small data, where n= me. Communications of the ACM, 57(4), 32-34.


Self-Tracking II, Self-Experimentation

Required reading

1. D.A. Epstein, et al. A lived informatics model of personal informatics. In Procs of the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (pp. 731-742). See Li et al’srelated model here (for background).

2. R. Karkar, et al. TummyTrials: A Feasibility Study of Using Self-Experimentation to Detect Individualized Food Triggers. In Proc. of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’17). [code]

3. N.L. London and W.T. London. A Case of Self-Experimentation. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997 Jul;6(7):475-6.

Optional (Self-Tracking):

R. Eveleth. How Self-Tracking Apps Exclude Women. The Atlantic, Dec 2014.

D Nafus, J Sherman. Big Data, Big Questions | This One Does Not Go Up To 11: The Quantified Self Movement as an Alternative Big Data Practice. International Journal of Communication, [S.l.], v. 8, p. 11, June 2014. ISSN 1932-8036.

F. Pasquale. The Algorithmic Self. The Hedgehog Review, Vol 17, No. 1 Spring 2015.

Optional (Self-Experimentation)

J.K. Davis. Self-Experimentation. Accountability in Research: Policies and Quality Assurance, 10:3, 175-187.

S.C. Gandevia. Self-experimentation, ethics, and efficacy. Monash Bioeth Rev 2005 Apr;24(2):43-8.

Kerridge, I. Altruism or reckless curiosity? A brief history of self-experimentation in medicine. Internal Medicine Journal, 33: 203–207.

Semi-Automated Sensing and Tracking; Human Activity Recognition

Required reading 

1. E. K. Choe et al.  Semi-Automated Tracking: A Balanced Approach for Self-Monitoring Applications in IEEE Pervasive Computing, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 74-84, Jan.-Mar. 2017.

2. S Voida, DJ Patterson, and SN Patel. Sensor Data StreamsWays of Knowing in HCI, JS Olson and WA Kellogg (eds.), Springer 2015.

3. A Bulling, U Blanke, B Schiele. A Tutorial on Human Activity Recognition Using Body-Worn Inertial Sensors. ACM Computing Surveys, Vol. 46, No. 3, Article 33, Jan 2014.


Eating and Nutrition

Required reading

1. S. Consolvo, P. Klasna, D. McDonald, and J. Landay. Foundations and Trends in HCI, Ch. 2 Section 1 (stop at 2.2).

Optional:

A. Grimes & R. Harper. Celebratory technology: new directions for food research in HCI. In Proc ACM CHI 2008 (pp. 467-476).

F. Cordeiro. E. Bales, E. Cherry, J. Fogarty. Rethinking the Mobile Food Journal:
Exploring Opportunities for Lightweight Photo-Based Capture.
In Proc ACM CHI 2015.

AJ Moshfegh, et al. The US Department of Agriculture Automated Multiple-Pass Method reduces bias in the collection of energy intakes. Am J Clin Nutr August 2008 vol. 88 no. 2 324-332


Sleep

Required reading

1. J. Behar, A. Roebuck, J.S. Domingos, E. Gederi and G.D. Clifford. A review of current sleep screening applications for smartphones. Physiol. Meas. 34 R29.

*2. JK Min, A Doryab, J Wiese et al. Toss ‘N’ Turn: Smartphone as Sleep and Sleep Quality Detector. In Proc. ACM CHI 2014. ACM, New York, NY USA.

Grad student presentation! Presenters, see these guidelines for presentations. All other students should submit commentaries using these guidelines for commenting on the paper. All students should submit their work (slides or comments) using T-Square (Assignments).

Optional Media

Kay, M., Choe, E. K., Shepherd, J., Greenstein, B., Watson, N., Consolvo, S., & Kientz, J. A. (2012, September). Lullaby: a capture & access system for understanding the sleep environment. In Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (pp. 226-234). ACM.

Some interesting information on sleep inertia is summarized here: https://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/snoozers-are-in-fact-losers

Work on: circadian-aware computing: http://hdexplore.calit2.net/webinar-21116/ [Video]

Abdullah, S., Matthews, M., Murnane, E. L., Gay, G., & Choudhury, T. (2014, September). Towards circadian computing: early to bed and early to rise makes some of us unhealthy and sleep deprived. In Proceedings of the 2014 ACM international joint conference on pervasive and ubiquitous computing(pp. 673-684). ACM.


Stress

Required viewing

Videos on understanding our stress response

“Why Don’t Zebras Get Ulcers, Why Do We?” –Robert Sapolsky
http://gatech.kanopystreaming.com/video/why-dont-zebras-get-ulcers-why-do-we

“The Nuts and Bolts of the Stress Response” –Robert Sapolsky
http://gatech.kanopystreaming.com/video/nuts-and-bolts-stress-response

Required reading 

1. J. Hernandez, P. Paredes, A. Roseway, M. Czerwinski. Under Pressure: Sensing Stress of Computer Users. In Proc. ACM CHI 2014

Optional:

Ertin et al. AutoSense: Unobtrusively Wearable Sensor Suite for Inferring the Onset, Causality, and Consequences of Stress in the Field. In Proc. ACM SenSys 2011


Feedback and Reflection

Required reading 

*1. F. Bentley, et al. Health Mashups: Presenting Statistical Patterns between Wellbeing Data and Context in Natural Language to Promote Behavior Change. ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum. Interact. 20, 5, Article 30 (November 2013).

2. S. Consolvo, et al. Designing for Healthy Lifestyles: Design Considerations for Mobile Technologies to Encourage Consumer Health and Wellness. Foundations and Trends in HCI, Ch. 3.

Grad student presentation! Presenters, see these guidelines for presentations. All other students should submit commentaries using these guidelines for commenting on the paper. All students should submit their work (slides or comments) using T-Square (Assignments).


Required viewing 

Study the gallery linked from: http://www.vizhealth.org/

Required reading 

3. EK Choe, et al. Understanding Quantified Selfers’ Practices in Collecting and Exploring Personal Data. In Proc. ACM CHI 2014. ACM, New York, NY USA.

*4. M. Kay, D. Morris, & m.c. Shrafel. There’s No Such Thing as Gaining a Pound: Reconsidering the Bathroom Scale User Interface. In Proc UbiComp’13.

Grad student presentation! Presenters, see these guidelines for presentations. All other students should submit commentaries using these guidelines for commenting on the paper. All students should submit their work (slides or comments) using T-Square (Assignments).

Optional:

N. Yau and J. Schneider. Self-Surveillance. Bulletin of the American Soc for Info Sci and Tech V. 35, Issue 5, pages 24–30, June/July 2009.


User-Centered Design for Behavioral Health Promotion

Required reading 

1. S. Mishra, P. Klasnja. Move into Another World of Happy: Insights for Designing Affect-Based Physical Activity Interventions (2017) PervasiveHealth-2017: 11th EAI International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare.

Theory-Driven Design for Behavior Change

Required reading 

*1. E.K. Choe, B. Lee, S. Munson, W. Pratt, J.A. Kientz. Persuasive Performance Feedback: The Effect of Framing on Self-Efficacy. In Proc. AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings. 2013;2013:825-833.

2. C. Abraham, S. Michie. A taxonomy of behavior change techniques used in interventions. Health Psychol. 2008 May;27(3):379-87.

3. J Lee, et al. 2017. Self-Experimentation for Behavior Change: Design and Formative Evaluation of Two Approaches. In Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’17).

Grad student presentation! Presenters, see these guidelines for presentations. All other students should submit commentaries using these guidelines for commenting on the paper. All students should submit their work (slides or comments) using T-Square (Assignments).


Required reading 

4. K Stawarz, A Cox, A Blandford. Beyond Self-Tracking and Reminders: Designing Smartphone Apps That Support Habit Formation. In Proc. ACM CHI 2015.

*5. S. Consolvo, P. Klasna, D. McDonald, and J. Landay. Designing for Healthy Lifestyles: Design Considerations for Mobile Technologies to Encourage Consumer Health and Wellness. Foundations and Trends in HCI, Ch. 4: Supporting Goal-Setting.

Grad student presentation! Presenters, see these guidelines for presentations. All other students should submit commentaries using these guidelines for commenting on the paper. All students should submit their work (slides or comments) using T-Square (Assignments).

Optional:

Robert Sapolsky. Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst

S Consolvo, D McDonald, and J Landay. Theory-Driven Design Strategies for Technologies that Support Behavior Change in Everyday Life. In Proc. ACM CHI 2009.


Health Games

Required reading

1. C. Kelley, L. Wilcox, W. Ng, J. Schiffer, J. Hammer. Design Features in Games for Health: Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Expert Perspectives. In Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ’17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 69-81.

*2. D. Lieberman. Designing Digital Games, Social Media, and Mobile Technologies to Motivate and Support Health Behavior Change. Public Communication Campaigns, 273-288.

Grad student presentation! Presenters, see these guidelines for presentations. All other students should submit commentaries using these guidelines for commenting on the paper. All students should submit their work (slides or comments) using T-Square (Assignments).

Optional

F. Mueller and K. Isbister. 2014. Movement-based game guidelines. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2191-2200. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2556288.2557163

A. Grimes, V. Kantroo & B. Grinter. Let’s Play! Mobile Health Games for Adults. In Proc UbiComp’ 2010 241-250.


mHealth Interventions

Optional

P. Klasnja, W. Pratt, Healthcare in the pocket: Mapping the space of mobile-phone health interventions. Journal of Biomedical Informatics, Volume 45, Issue 1, 2012, Pages 184-198, ISSN 1532-0464.


Social Interventions

Required Reading

1. S. Munson, H. Cavusoglu, L. Frisch, S. Fels. Sociotechnical Challenges and Progress in Using Social Media for Health. J Med Internet Res 2013 (Oct 22); 15(10):e226

2. M.W. Newman, D. Lauterbach & S. Munson et al. “It’s not that I don’t have problems, I’m just not putting them on Facebook”: Challenges and Opportunities in Using Online Social Networks for Health. In Proc. ACM CSCW 2011.

3. TBD


Patient Participation in Healthcare

Required Reading

1. D.J. Solove. HIPAA Turns 10: Analyzing the Past, Present, and Future Impact 84 J. of AHIMA 22 (2013).

2. A. Hartzler & W. Pratt. Managing the personal side of health: how patient expertise differs from the expertise of clinicians. J Med Internet Res., 13(3) 2011 Aug 16; e62.

3. P.West, R. Giordano, M. Van Kleek, and N. Shadbolt. The Quantified Patient in the Doctor’s Office: Challenges & Opportunities. In Proc of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 3066-3078.

Optional

H.M. Mentis, A. Komlodi, K.Schrader, et al. Crafting a View of Self-Tracking Data in the Clinical Visit. Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’17), New York, NY, USA, 5800-5812.

User-Centered Design for Patient Engagement

Required reading

1. L.Wilcox, D. Morris, D. Tan, J. Gatewood. Designing Patient-Centric Information Displays for Hospitals. Proc. ACM CHI ’10, the 28th international conference on Human factors in computing systems. April 2010, Atlanta, GA, 2123-2132.

2. M. Hong, C.Feustel, M. Agnihori, M.Silverman, S. Simoneaux, L. Wilcox. Supporting Families in Reviewing and Communicating about Radiology Imaging Studies. Proc. ACM CHI ’17, The 2017 annual conf on Human Factors in Computing. May 2017, Denver, CO, USA, 5245-5256.


Evaluation: Experiment Design

Required Reading

1. Dallery, J., Cassidy, R. N., & Raiff, B. R. Single­-Case experimental designs to evaluate novel technology­-based health interventions. J Med Internet Res., 15(2), e22.


2. Mohr DC, Cheung K, Schueller SM, Brown CH, Duan N. Continuous evaluation of evolving behavioral intervention technologies.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2013 Oct;45(4):517­523.

Required Viewing 

Dr. Susan Murphy: Micro-randomized Trials for JITAI Development

Applications: Diabetes and IBD

Required Reading 

1. F. Nunes, et al. 2015. Self-Care Technologies in HCI: Trends, Tensions, and Opportunities. ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum. Interact. 22, 6, Article 33 (December 2015)

2. Lena Mamykina, Elizabeth Mynatt, Patricia Davidson, and Daniel Greenblatt. 2008. MAHI: investigation of social scaffolding for reflective thinking in diabetes management.  In Proc ACM CHI 2008, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 477-486.

3. Chung CF, Cook J, Bales E, Zia J, Munson SA. More Than Telemonitoring: Health Provider Use and Nonuse of Life-Log Data in Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Weight Management. J Med Internet Res 2015;17(8):e203


Applications: Mental Health

Required reading

1. S.M. Schueller, A. Aguilera, D.C. Mohr. Ecological momentary interventions for depression and anxiety.Preventive Medicine, 34:6 June 2017, 540-545.

2. DC Mohr, AR Lyon, EG Lattie, M Reddy & SM Schueller. Accelerating digital mental health research from early design and creation to successful implementation and sustainment.JMIR 19, 5, e153, May 2017,

3. C. Kelley, B. Lee, & L. Wilcox. Self-tracking for Mental Wellness: Understanding Expert Perspectives and Student Experiences. In Proc of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 629-641.

4. S.Servia-Rodríguez, K.K. Rachuri, C. Mascolo, P.J. Rentfrow, N. Lathia, & G.M. Sandstrom. Mobile Sensing at the Service of Mental Well-being: a Large-scale Longitudinal Study. In Proc of the 26th International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW ’17). International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee, Republic and Canton of Geneva, Switzerland, 103-112.

Optional:

M. Rabbi, S. Ali, T. Choudhury, & E Berke. 2011. Passive and In-Situ assessment of mental and physical well-being using mobile sensors. In Proc of the 13th international conference on Ubiquitous computing (UbiComp ’11). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 385-394.

M. Osipov, Y. Behzadi, J.M. Kane, G. Petrides, & G.D. Clifford. Objective identification and analysis of physiological and behavioral signs of schizophrenia. Journal of Mental Health V. 24, No. 3.

M. Matthews, S. Abdullah, G. Gay, & T. Choudhury, T. Tracking mental well-being: Balancing rich sensing and patient needs. Computer, 47(4), 36-43.